How to become a certified TBBA Junior Trainer – the Form (3/3)

Would you like to not only improve your BailongBall game, but also share what you have learned with others? Are you thinking about starting / growing a group of BailongBall players or even becoming a coach? If so, you probably have many questions: How long is the trainer program, what is its content and where is it being offered? Is there an examination and if so, what exactly will I be tested on, by whom and how? Are there different types of trainers or levels and if so, which ones and what distinguishes them? What does a TBBA certification actually stand for? …

In this series of blog posts we want to give you answers to the many questions reagarding the TBBA trainer certifications and encourage you to take the next step in your BailongBall game.

A quick refresher:

In the first three parts of this series we will cover the Junior Trainer program and certification. Part 1 deals with the so-called “Solo Techniques”, part 2 with the “Mutiplay Techniques” and part 3 with the “Basic Form”. In part 4 and following we will then focus on the Senior Trainer Progarm and certification.

But one step at a time. The Taiji Bailong Ball Association (TBBA) has set out to spread BailongBall in Europe according to the playing principles of the sport’s inventor, Professor Bai Rong. So if you want to learn BailongBall “in the spirit of the inventor”, TBBA is the right place for you. You can get your level of skills certified by TBBA and promote your training or even your school with it.

The Junior Trainer is the first level of the TBBA trainer certifications. It gives you the skills and tools to train players in all BailongBall disciplines. In the next level, that of the Senior Trainer, you develop your skills to the point where you can not only further individual talents of advanced players, but also train junior coaches. As an Instructor you will achieve the highest TBBA Trainer certification, which allows you to additionally train senior coaches.

In the Junior Coach program you will learn the playing principles that make this sport unique among ball and racket sports: the round movements, using the entire body, the elasticity, dynamics and smoothness of the moves and finally the receiving of the ball and reversing its direction.

What makes our sport so unique are not only the playing principles but also the game variations. These are also part of your training and allow you to gain a foothold in all disciplines – be it Multiplay, Freestyle or Form. As a Junior Trainer, you will have the capability and flexibility to offer your students the full variety of BailongBall.

After the solo techniques of the first part and the multiplay techniques of the second part, we will deal with the form in this final part of the Junior Trainer Curriculum. Specifically, it is about the so-called “Basic Form”. It features, Solo Play and even Multiplay components, which are executed in a defined sequence, in rhythm to a defined background music. The content and speed of the movements are, therefore, precisely specified. Some elements are performed with the ball in the hand, others with the ball on the racket. All together there are 10 elements. We start with a short explanation and the corresponding video covering each element. At the end you will find a list with more details about the elements, as well as the video showing the whole form in one piece.

Arm Circling

The actual circling of the arms is preceded by assuming a starting position, which can also be found in many other forms. You stand straight, legs parallel and closed, arms hanging loosely and close to the body. And off you go:

Body Circle

In this element, you “draw a circle around your body” with the racquet and the ball – picture a compass. The tip of the racket and the ball point downwards.

Sky Circle

The sky circle is closely related to the Body Circle. Simply rotate racquet and ball so that both are pointing up.

Horizontal Rotation

By combining the sky circle with a rotation to the left and back to the right, you perform the Horizontal Rotation.

Diagonal Rotation

You may recognize this element from multiplay – it’s a simple Diagonal Rotation in both directions. However, this one is performed with the ball in your hand.

Dynamic Horizontal Rotation

The opening and closing movement with arms and legs at the beginning and end of the Horizontal Rotation results in the Dynamic Horizontal Rotation.

Dynamic Diagonal Rotation

As with the Diagonal Rotation, this multiplay move is initially performed with the ball in your hand in both directions. However, you add a step to the spin (which allows you, for example, to return balls that you receive behind your starting position).

Horizontal Rotation with Ball

This element has already been introduced, but this time the ball is on the racket.

Dynamic Diagonal Rotation with Ball

You guessed it – the ball is on the racket for performing the Dynamic Rotation from above.

Horizontal 8

The last element is performed statically, i.e. on one spot. You “draw a horizontal 8” in front of your body, with the ball on your racket.

And there you are: you have learned all the elements of the Basic Form. Now, let’s describe those 10 elements in some more detail:

  1. Arm Circling
    – 4 circles from top to bottom
    – 4 circles from bottom to top
    – 4 circles from top to bottom
    – 4 circles from bottom to top
  1. Body Circle
    – alternating 8x to the left…
    – …and 8x to the right
  2. Sky Circle
    – alternating 8x to the left…
    – …and 8x to the right
  3. Horizontal Rotation
    – static (on the spot) alternating 1x to the left…
    – …and 1x to the right
    – dynamic (360° pivoting or with 2 steps) 1x rotation to the left
    – static (on the spot) alternating 1x rotation to the right…
    – …and 1x rotation to the left
    – dynamic (360° pivoting or with 2 steps) 1x rotatioin to the right
    – repeat the movements above
  4. Diagonal Rotation
    – 1 diagonal rotation to the left / counterclockwise
    – 1 diagonal rotation to the right / clockwise
    – 1 diagonal rotation to the left / counterclockwise
    – 1 diagonal rotation to the right / clockwise
  5. Dynamic Horizontal Rotation
    – 1 opening step to the left, arms stretched to each side
    – 1 closing step to the left, arms stretched to each side
    – 1 horizontal rotation to the left / counterclockwise, arms stretched to each side
    – 1 closing step to the right, arms lowered to the body at the same time
    – 1 opening step to the left, arms stretched to each side
    – 1 closing step to the right, arms stretched to each side
    – 1 horizontal rotation to the right / clockwise, arms stretched to each side
    – 1 closing step to the left, arms lowered to the body at the same time
    – repeat the movements above
  6. Dynamic Diagonal Rotation
    – 1 turn to the left by 90°
    – 1 closing step to the back
    – 1 opening step to the back
    – diagonal rotation to the left / counterclockwise
    – lunge forward at the end of the diagonal turn or alternatively take 2 steps forward
    – 1 turn to the right by 90°
    – 1x closing step to the back
    – 1x opening step to the back
    – diagonal rotation to the right / clockwise
    – lunge forward at the end of the diagonal turn or alternatively take 2 steps forward
    – repeat the movements above 3x
  7. Horizontal Rotation with Ball
    – place the ball on the racket
    – movements as in “6. Dynamic Horizontal Rotation”
  8. Dynamic Diagonal Rotation with Ball
    – ball is on the racket
    – movements as in “7. Dynamic Diagonal Rotation”
  9. Horizontal 8
    – ball is on the racket
    – start movement from bottom right (so-called “simple 8” – in contrast to “reverse 8”, which starts from top right) and “draw an 8 lying on its side” in front of you
    – repeat Horizontal 8 seven times
And this is how the form looks beginning to end:

As promised at the beginning, here are some answers to frequently asked questions:

How long does it take to become a Junior Trainer?
To be eligible for the exam, a minimum of 30 hours of training must be completed with a certified trainer. Depending on the intensity of the training, this can be done in one piece (e.g. one week of training) or intermittently (e.g. through intervals: days of instructions by trainers followed by days of practicing of what you have learned on your own – intervals can be customized to meet individual needs). Regardless of the format of the training, you should of course rehearse in order to solidify what you have learned and to be able to recall it during the exam. A certified trainer will help you work out what is right for you.

What is the content of the curriculum?
The training enables you to teach the components described in this blog series (solo play, multiplay and form) to a beginner. For this you will be instructed in the principles of the game theoretically as well as practically. Details on training programs are available from certified trainers.

Where can I be trained?

Contact a certified trainer – you can find an overview of locations and contact persons on this page. You can also inquire centrally via our contact page. By the way, training courses can now also be held completely via online meetings – here is a post covering respective impressions.

Is there an examination and if so, what is examined, by whom and how?
At the end of your training you will be examined by a certified trainer. This can be done “on site” or via video / online conference. The exam is a purely practical exam (no theoretical components). You can find all the contents of the Junior Trainer exam in this 3-part blog series. You can also find a summary of the exam components here. Interested on how to proceed after the Junior Trainer? The same link will also provide details of the exam components for Senior Trainers as well as for Instructors.

By the way, a TBBA membership is a prerequisite for trainer certifications. And such a membership offers a lot of benefits – even if you don’t want to become a trainer (yet). Why? Have a look here.
As you can see, the Junior Trainer curriculum is not only versatile, it also offers you many options. And above all: it’s a lot of fun. Come on board 🙂

Xiaofei Sui
BailongBall Instructor

Mike Ritz
BailongBall Trainer

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